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Glossary of Library Processing Terminology

14 digit codabar—Type of Symbology.
1987 Microlif—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: Pre 1991 Microlif, IBM.Fil, MAC.Fil, 949 tags
1991 Microlif—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: USMARC / 852 Holdings, MARC21, MICROLIF.001, 852 tags
3M Theft Detection—Also known as Tattle Tape
AACR2—Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd Edition. Rules used to catalog publications.
Abridged Dewey—A condensed Dewey Decimal number. Abridged is an unabridged Dewey Decimal number to the first prime.
Added Entry Cards—Catalog Card that is identified by a joint author, illustrator, etc.
Annotation—Summary / description of the publication.
Ascension Numbers—If a customer does not use bar codes, they may use accession numbers. It is a sequential number that is assigned to each book.
Bar Code Prefix—A code / number that is assigned to the beginning of a bar code number that usually denotes a code for books, usually a "3" and a school code, this is followed by the actual bar code number.
Bar Code Label—Label that contains bar codes required for scanning publications in the library. Used for inventory purposes as well as for recording books in patrons’ possession. Bar Code labels can be Smart or Generic. Scholastic Library Publishing offers Smart Bar code labels.
BIB Record—Bibliographic Record. Compilation of information about the publication.
Bibliographic Record—Cataloging Record / contents of catalog cards.
Call Number—There are two main kinds of call numbers, Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress. This number denotes where the publication should be placed on the shelf.
Call Number Prefix—A prefix customer may require along with the Dewey Decimal Number. Example: J for Juvenile titles.
Cataloging Record—Bibliographic Record or information found on catalog cards.
Check Digit—A check digit is a digit added to a number (either at the end or the beginning) that validates the authenticity of the number. A simple algorithm is applied to the other digits of the number, which yields the check digit.

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Check Point—Theft Detection. (There are several frequencies).
CIP Data—Cataloging in Publication. This is the cataloging record that is created from information provided before the book is published and appears in the publication, usually on the copyright page.
Circulation / Borrowers’ Card—Card in which patron indicates their name and any other data required by the library, so they know who has the publication.
Code 3 of 9—Type of Symbology.
Code 39 MOD 10—Type of Symbology. Check digited symbology. Always numeric.
Code 39 MOD 43—Type of Symbology. Check digited symbology. Can be alpha, numeric, character or blank.
Computer Type—The type of computer the customer uses and has their software loaded on. Example: IBM, Macintosh
Data Disk—A floppy disk that contains a MARC Record. In simple words, it contains the data that is on the catalogs cards / cataloging data.
Date Due Card—Grid that is usually a part of the book pocket that is stamped by the librarian to indicate when the patron must return the book.
Date Due Slip—Grid that is attached to the book that is stamped by the librarian to indicate when the patron must return the book.
Date Due Theft Detection—Very similar to check point, although it has a location for a date due to appear.
Dewey Decimal System—Classification of books and other publications into 10 major categories. Developed by Melvin Dewey in 1876.
Follett 2 of 5—Type of Symbology. Can start with a prefix of "T".
Generic Bar Code Labels—Bar Code Label that has no book information on it. Normally these do not correspond to a particular book. Scholastic Library Publishing does not use Generic Bar Code Labels.
Interleaved 2 of 5—Type of Symbology.

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IBM.Fil—Type of MARC format. Also referred to as: 1987 Microlif, Pre 1991 Microlif, 949 tags
ISBN—International Standard Book Number. A unique 9 or 10 digit number assigned to a publication.
ISSN—International Standard Serial Number
Knogo Strips—Knogo is a company who distributes theft detection devices
LCCN—Library of Congress Catalog Card number. The first two digits of this number reflect the year in which LC cataloged the publication.
Library of Congress—Founded in 1800, the national library of the United States.
Library of Congress Children’s Subject Headings—Subject Headings geared towards a child’s interest: such as Cats.
Library of Congress Subject Headings—Subject Headings geared towards adult interest: such as Felines.
Local Holdings—In most cases, refers to information about the publication that is specific to the library, such as a bar code number.
MAC.Fil—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: Pre 1991 Microlif, 1987 Microlif, 949 tags
Main Entry and Added Entries—Denotes whether a publication should be cataloged under more than one author or title. A main entry is the primary and added entry is the secondary point for the bibliographic record.
Main Entry Card—Also known as author card. Catalog card that is identified by the author.
Main Entry Letters—Letters of author’s surname requested on cataloging.

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Marc Format—The format in which the cataloging data, bibliographic and authority records are communicated. Different systems require the data to be in different formats in order for it to be imported.
MARC21—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: USMARC / 852 holdings, 1991 Microlif, MICROLIF.001, 852 tags
MICROLIF.001—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: USMARC / 852 Holdings, MARC21, 852 tags, 1991 Microlif
Mylar Cover—Clear polyester cover placed on the book.
Pocket—A pocket that is placed in the publication for a borrower’s card or other cards to be housed. It may also contain the date due information.
Pre 1991 Microlif—Type of MARC format. Also referred to as: 1987 Microlif, IBM.Fil, MAC.Fil, 949 tags
Property Stamp—Stamp or labels provided by customer that is stamped / affixed to publication. This identifies the library that owns the publication.
Protector—A clear cover that is applied over the spine label and bar code label for protection.
Reading Program Label—Label that indicates which Reading Program is being used. Also indicates reading level and points value.
Second Prime—Where Dewey Decimal ends, the length of the number when second prime is requested. Example: 971.34'627'123 Ending at second prime would be 971.34'627.
Smart Bar Code Label—Bar Code label contains the following: Library Name, Book Title, Call Number, and Bar Code Number. Scholastic Library Publishing used Smart Bar Codes.
Shelf List Card—Contains limited data such as: Interest and Reading level, price, reviews, etc.
Software—The software system the customer uses for their library automation.
Spine Label—Label that is placed on the publication which reflects either the Dewey Decimal or Library of Congress call numbers.
Sub Field—A sub field within a field that specific data is stored (i.e. school code).
Subject Card—Catalog Card that is identified by the subject.

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Subject Headings—Headings under which the item will be listed. Such as dogs, books on dogs and canines would all be listed under Dogs.
Symbology—The format in which the bar codes are printed on the bar code labels. (The number of lines, the length and width of each line).
Tattle Tape Theft Detection—Also known as 3M.
Title Card—Catalog Card that is identified by the title.
Tracings—Bibliographic record has added entries.
Unabridged Dewey—The full Dewey Decimal number (versus abridged).
Union Cataloging—Schools and libraries that pool their cataloging information so other locations may "borrow" the publications. Done mostly in FL and PA.
Pennsylvania (Access PA)
Florida (Sunlink)
USMARC Communications—Type of MARC Format. Also referred to as: Other Holdings, 852 tags, 949 tags
USMARC / 852 Holdings—Type of MARC format. Also referred to as: 1991 Microlif or MARC21, MICROLIF.001, 852 tags

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